Never forget that killing persons with disabilities was Nazi policy too

Cross-posted from TheLeadingEdge Blog

We can talk round in circles all we want, but at the end of the day there is no escaping the fact that killing persons with disabilities in order to create a ‘better’ world was one of the fundamental evils of the Nazi regime.

Not only did the Nazi Aktion T4 euthanasia programme kill an estimated 200,000 children and adults with disabilities and other undesirable traits, but it became the very template that was utilized for the ‘Final Solution’. The architects of the Final Solution adopted the gas chamber and crematoria that were specifically designed for the German euthanasia programme, and staff from the euthanasia programme took on prominent roles in the Nazi death camps which killed approx. 6 millions Jews.

Any person of goodwill should be alarmed by the fact that NZ is operating its very own screening programme which weeds out persons with Downs syndrome, and other conditions, and that the majority of these persons are then killed by NZ abortionists.

And we should be extremely concerned by any person who publicly declares that such unjust screening programmes are helping to create a better world.

To suggest that this attitude is any different to the prejudicial animus that was directed at persons with disabilities by the Nazi regime is nothing more than dishonest semantics.

Just consider the following words from Adolf Hitler:

“Sparta must be regarded as the first völkisch state. The exposure of the sick, weak, deformed children, in short, their destruction, was more decent and in truth a thousand times more human than the wretched insanity of our day which preserves the most pathological subject.”

Now ask yourself whether such twisted sentiment is really all that different from the claim that killing people with Down syndrome in utero is a good thing, or that it will lead to be a better world.

The simple truth is that future historians will not talk kindly of the West for our screening programmes.

They will rightly point out the grave hypocrisy in the fact that, on the one hand we condemned the violations of human dignity perpetrated by the Nazi regime, while at the same time running an almost identical prejudicial campaign against persons with disabilities ourselves.

In the words of Angelika Probst, sister of Christoph Probst, a doctor killed by the Nazis for being part of the peaceful anti-Nazi resistance group ‘The White Rose’:

“I myself did not at first grasp the full horror of the situation. Christoph made it clear to me. He showed me that it was not given to any human being, in any circumstance, to make judgments that are reserved to God alone. No one, he said, can know what goes on in the soul of a mentally afflicted person. No one can know what secret inner ripening can come from suffering and sorrow. Every individual’s life is priceless. We are all dear to God.”

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